Tag: hemp

Super Smoothie Bowls With Hemp Seeds

 

CHOC BANANA SMOOTHIE BOWL

Ingredients

  • 2 frozen bananas
  • 1/3 cup of coconut yogurt (add more if needed)
  • 2 tablespoons of cacao powder
  • Optional: 1 teaspoon of honey or agrave

Toppings

Hemp seeds, cacao nibs, chia seeds, shredded coconut, scoop of peanut butter

Method

  1. Let the frozen bananas sit out on the counter for 5-10 minutes for easier blending.
  2. Blend the banana, yogurt and cacao until the mixture becomes creamy.
  3. Transfer to one regular bowl or two small bowls.
  4. Sprinkle with toppings and enjoy!

BEERY BLISS SMOOTHIE BOWL

Ingredients

  • 1 heaped cup of organic frozen berries
  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1/3 cup of coconut yogurt or 1/4 cup of nut milk (add more if needed)

Toppings

Hemp seeds, blueberries, strawberries, passionfruit, shredded coconut

Method

  • Blend berries, yogurt and banana until the mixture becomes creamy.
  • Transfer to one regular bowl or two small bowls.
  • Sprinkle with toppings and enjoy!

GREEN MACHINE SMOOTHIE BOWL

Ingredients

    • 2 decent handfuls of spinach
    • 1/2 cup of mango
    • 1/2 avocado
    • 1/4 cup of coconut yogurt (add more if needed)
    • 3-4 pieces of ice

Toppings

Hemp seeds, blueberries, kiwi fruit, chia seeds, buckwheat

Method

  1. Blend spinach, mango, yogurt and avocado until the mixture becomes creamy.
  2. Transfer to one regular bowl or two small bowls.
  3. Sprinkle with toppings and enjoy!
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Better Bolognese Recipe

 

by Health Nomad

Better Bolognese

Ingredients

      • 1 Large brown onion (chopped)
      • 2-3 cloves of garlic (finely chopped of crushed)
      • 2 cups of walnuts or almonds (blended)
      • 2 cans of lentils
      • 1 cup of organic red wine (optional)
      • 1 cup of sunflower seeds
      • 700g of passats
      • 500g pasta sauce of choice (check ingredients to make sure it doesn’t contain meat, eggs or dairy)</>
      • 1 tbs salt (add more if needed)
      • 1 tsp pepper (add more if needed)
      • 1 handful freshly chopped parsley OR basil
      • 1 tbs each fresh oregano and thyme (2 tbs each if using dried herbs)
      • 1/2 cup hemp seeds
      • Your favorite pasta

      Method

      1. In a large pot, add onion and half a cup of water. Cook until onion starts to turn translucent and add more water if needed.
      2. Add garlic, oregano, thyme and lentils, mixing well (add the tiniest bit of water if ingredients start to stick to bottom of pan).
      3. Once you start to smell the fragrance of the herbs add pasta sauce, passata, red wine, salt, pepper, sunflower seeds and nut meal. Incorporate well on medium heat.
      4. Once bubbles start to appear on surface add chopped parsley or basil and simmer on low heat for a minimum of 20 minutes, stirring frequently to prevent sauce from burning on the bottom of pot.
      5. Take sauce off the heat and mix in hemp seeds before serving on top of your favourite pasta. Buon appetito!

      Health Nomad

      Georgia Steele is a certified yoga teacher and current natural medicine student with a passion for holistic health, travel and plant based food.

      Check out Georgia’s website for other delicious recipes or her instagram.

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Hemp Basil Pesto Pasta Recipe

by Demi-Rose

Ingredients

 

Pesto

  • 1/2 cup of hemp seeds
  • 2 cups of basil leaves packed
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon
  • 2 cloves of garlic crushed
  • 3 tbs of olive + more depending on desired consistency
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Pasta

  • 1/2 punnet of cherry tomatoes halved
  • 1/3 cup of Kalamata olives
  • 300g of gluten free spaghetti pasta

Method

  1. Boil 1 litre of water over medium-high heat.
  2. Pour in dry pasta, adding a dash of oil so it doesn’t stick together.
  3. Whilst pasta is cooking blitz together pesto ingredients in food processor, pulsing 5-10 seconds at a time.
  4. Once pasta has soften removed from heat and strain.
  5. Toss pasta, pesto, cherry tomatoes and olives together in a bowl and portion out 3-4 servings depending on how big you want them.

Demi-Rose

Demi-Rose aka ‘Happy Little Veganmite’ is a mastermind of plant based recipes, she shares her mouth-watering creations via her website and instagram.

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Seeded loaf with Hemp Seeds

 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup of hemp seeds
  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/2 cup hazelnuts or almonds
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  • 2 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • 4 Tbsp. psyllium seed husks (3 Tbsp. if using psyllium husk powder)
  • 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt (add ½ tsp. if using coarse salt)
  • 1 Tbsp. maple syrup
  • 3 Tbsp. melted coconut oil
  • 1 1/2 cups water

Method

    1. Mix all dry ingredients in a silicon loaf pan, stir well. Whisk maple syrup, oil and water together in a measuring cup. Add this to the dry ingredients and mix very well until everything is completely soaked and the dough becomes thick (if the dough is too thick to stir, add one or two teaspoons of water until the dough softens). Smooth out the top with the back of a spatula. Let the dough sit out on the counter for at least 2 hours, or all day/overnight. To make sure the dough is ready, it should retain its shape when you pull the sides of the loaf pan away from it.
    2. Preheat oven to 175C.
    3. Place loaf pan in the oven on the middle rack, and bake for 20 minutes. Remove bread from loaf pan, place it upside down directly on the rack and bake for another 30-40 minutes. The bread is done when it sounds hollow when tapped. Let cool completely before slicing.
    4. Store bread in a tightly sealed container for up to five days (If you can make it last that long!). Freezes well too – slice before freezing for quick and easy toast!
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Hemp Cashew Mayo Sauce Recipe

 

by Jess Wallace

Ingredients

 

  • 1/3 cup of hemp seeds
  • 1 cup of raw cashews, soaked
  • 1/2 cup of water to start + little more for desired consistency
  • 1/4 cup of nutritional yeast
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Sprinkle of garlic salt

Method

    1. Soak the cashews for at least half an hour, then drain
    2. Blend with the 1/2 cup of water until smooth consistency. Keep thick if using for a mayo/spread, or add more water to have with pasta.
    3. Whilst pasta is cooking blitz together pesto ingredients in food processor, pulsing 5-10 seconds at a time.
    4. Add the hemp seeds, lemon juice, nutritional yeast and garlic salt then blend again until smooth.
    5. Keeps well in fridge for up to 5 days. Eat on crackers, with pasta or as a platter dip!

Jess Wallace

Jess is passionate about plant based foods, veganism and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. She shares her magical creations on her instagram page, be sure to check them out!!

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Hemp Plastic – Benefits, Uses & Characteristics

It is clear that our overuse of plastics in everyday life is having a devastating impact on our planet. Most plastics produced today are made using petroleum-based compounds that release unhealthy gases into the atmosphere. Waste solutions are inefficient, and harmful by-products toxify our land, water and wildlife.

It is estimated between 250 to 300 million tonnes of plastics are manufactured every year. 10% of plastics are recycled; the rest of it goes to landfills or ends up as litter in the environment.

At a time of unprecedented climate change and accelerating extinction risk, we need to establish eco-friendly approaches to plastic to help reduce our negative footprint on this planet. This will be no easy feat.

BIOPLASTIC

Bioplastics are plastics derived from renewable biomass sources. Depending on the manufacturing process they can be biodegradable, 100% toxic free, and sustainably produced. The idea for bioplastics is nothing new, but has been largely ignored for its cheaper, petroleum-based alternatives.

“Bioplastics have far less impact on the environment, with studies showing bioplastics can reduce CO2 emissions by 30-80% compared to traditional plastics.”

Bioplastics can be used for a huge number of disposable items including packaging, bowls, cutlery, straws, bags and bottles. These plastics can also be used for non-disposable items such as mobiles, piping, cars and more.

Resources used in bioplastics have far less impact on the environment, with studies showing they can reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 30-80% compared to traditional plastics. In addition, bioplastics can originate from carbon-negative resources (such as hemp) – giving a permanent removal of the greenhouse gas CO2 from Earth’s atmosphere.

 

HEMP BIOPLASTIC

Hemp bioplastic is an affordable, natural fibre composite that can be used to replace oil-based materials. Biodegradable, recyclable and toxin-free – hemp bioplastic can help address many pressing environmental issues.

Hemp plastics are made from the stalk of the plant. The stalk provides a high cellulose count which is required for the plastic construction, providing both strength and flexibility. Cellulose is the most plentiful organic polymer found on Earth, and plays a fundamental role in the cell walls of plants and many algae species.

Hemp contains around 65-70% cellulose compared to wood 40%, flax 65-75%, and cotton up to 90%. What makes hemp really shine is its high cellulose count combined with its favourable growing characteristics and low environmental impact.

From seed to harvest (10-15ft tall), hemp plants take just 3-4 months to grow. Commonly referred to as “weed” for a reason, the hemp plant grows incredibly fast, and has adapted to grow on every continent except Antarctica. Hemp plants are experts at absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere, this helping them to grow quickly and outpace competing plants. Hemp plants also require fewer pesticides, fertilisers and water than other bioplastic resources such as cotton and wood, providing a more environmentally friendly, low maintenance crop.

Dope Fact: Hemp plants are known to absorb as much as 4x the amount of CO2 from the atmosphere as trees, while growing in a fraction of the time.

Today there are only a few companies making use of hemp in the production of bioplastics. With hemp often wrongly tied in with cannabis legislation, this can lead to sourcing difficulties. Hemp by-products are often imported from countries such as China and France where growing licenses are more easily obtained. This can add sufficient costs to the production process, and has undoubtedly slowed research efforts into hemps use as a bioplastic. Despite these difficulties, there are companies taking advantage of the diverse and favourable characteristics of the hemp plant, paving the way for more companies to learn and adapt on their success.

Let’s check out two progressive companies working in the hemp-bioplastic space.

 

HEMP PLASTICS IN USE

Kanesis

Kanesis, a company based in Siciliy are producing a 3D-printer filament made entirely from the waste of hemp production. Their goal is to “Produce industrial products from natural raw materials, and stimulate research on the use of sustainable materials.”

Entwined hemp filament uses no dyes, allowing it to maintain a true natural brown colour. “It’s almost iridescent in its ability to showcase different shades and densities within the same printed object. There’s also a large amount of visible bio-fill, something you don’t get with standard Polylactic Acid (PLA) plastics.”

Called HempBioPlastic (HBP), it has shown to be more efficient and more aesthetically pleasing than other bioplastics on the market. HBP has shown to be 20% lighter and 30% stronger than PLA – the most common plastic used in 3D-printing filaments. HBP filaments are also seen as favourable to its competitors (ABS and PLA) not only because of its positive eco-foot print, but also due to its favourable weight/volume ratio.

Through the popularisation of 3D printing, consumers are now armed with the ability to manufacture objects in the comfort of their own home. As we search for sustainable solutions to plastic, the potential to do this with a 100% natural and eco-friendly by-product is very timely.

Zeoform

Australian based Zeoform have developed what they are calling “A revolutionary material that changes everything.” Made from only cellulose fibres and water, their patented process converts cellulose fibres into an industrial strength material capable of being shaped into an infinite array of products. It is made without any glues, binders, chemicals or synthetics.

Utilising hemp cellulose, Zeoform is 100% non-toxic, biodegradable and compostable. It can produce commercial and industrial grade materials ranging from Styrofoam, to hard and resilient building materials. Like Kanesis, Zeoform intend to produce a 3D printing ‘feedstock’, combing bio-polymers and other elements for an almost unlimited product range.

 

THE FUTURE OF PLASTIC

As a progressive species we need to change our relationship with plastics, if not for ourselves then for future generations. Plastics have become so entrenched in everyday life that it is easy to be oblivious to the negative impact they are having on our planet. Bioplastics provide a real solution to maintaining the functionality of plastics, while minimising our ecological footprint.

Making drastic changes to plastic manufacturing techniques on a global scale will not happen overnight. There are few economic incentives for companies to do so, with profitability and accessibility driving the decision process – maintaining the desire for cheaper petroleum-based, non-biodegradable plastics . What we need to initiate this positive change will be consumers and businesses that create innovative ways to support and champion such change.

Companies like Kanesis and Zeoform highlight some of the possibilities of using hemp in the production of bioplastics. Their innovative techniques demonstrate the versatility and aesthetically pleasing properties of hemp bioplastics, while taking advantage of the plants eco-friendly properties. Let’s hope they continue to pave the way for more companies to build upon this vision.

Footnote:

* At Hempme we love to find companies sharing a passion for the hemp plant and its role in the sustainability movement. We will keep a close eye on progress in this space and continue to share the fantastic work of these forward-thinking companies.

* Our face cream tube is currently made of a 100% biodegradable plastic. Although not made from hemp, we endeavour to find solutions to eventually allow all of our products to be housed in hemp bioplastic.



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Hemp Seed – The Superfood

The hemp seed (or hemp heart) has been an important source of nutrition for many cultures for thousands of years, and is the true definition of ‘superfood’. In its natural state hemp seed is considered by many to be the safest, most balanced, natural and complete source of protein, amino acids, and essential fats found in nature. Technically a nut, hemp seed contains on average 30% oil, and 25% protein, with considerable amounts of dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals.

Hemp seeds have been ignored for their nutritional benefits because of hemp’s relationship to cannabis; however hemp seeds don’t cause any psychotropic (high) reactions, and are extremely nutritious. Let’s take a look at its key features and how you can benefit from it.

Healthy Fats at the Optimal Ratio

The oil in hemp seeds is typically over 80% in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and is an exceptionally rich source of the two essential fatty acids (EFAs) linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3). The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 in hemp seed oil is generally 2:1-3:1, this is considered to be optimal for human health. No other single plant source contains the oils essential to life in this perfect ratio as well as hemp.

Western diets are commonly very unbalanced, displaying a ratio of around 10:1. This high ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in our modern diet likely plays a role in the occurrence of various skin problems, and inflammatory diseases.

The EFAs are fatty acids that cannot be made by humans, and thus must be obtained through diet. Diets that contain sufficient EFAs and PUFAs have shown to lower both arterial levels of LDL-cholesterol and blood pressure in humans. PUFA’s also increase bleeding times which results in decreased peripheral blood pressure and clot formation.

Amino Acid and Protein Profile

The two main proteins found in hempseed are Edestin and albumin. These high-quality storage proteins are easily digested and contain significant amounts of all essential amino acids.

Edestin Protein

Edestin protein is found only in hemp seed. Edestin protein is similar to the human body’s own globular proteins found in blood plasma. Edestin protein produces antibodies which are vital to maintain a healthy immune system. Since Edestin protein closely resembles the globulin in blood plasma, it’s very compatible with the human digestive system. This could explain why there are very few reported food allergies to hemp foods. Edestin protein has also been shown to promote a healthy immune system as well as eliminate stress.

Albumin Protein

Albumin protein is another high quality globulin protein and is similar to that found in egg whites. Albumin is highly digestible and is a major source of free radical scavengers. In fact, Albumin is the current industry standard for protein evaluation. (Reference) Albumin protein also assists in maintaining the strength of tissues that hold the body together.

Amino Acids

Digestion transforms hemp protein into amino acids which are the basic building blocks required for the growth and maintenance of body tissue. (Reference)

Hemp protein uniquely contains all of the 21 known amino acids — including 9 essential amino acids (EAAs). These amino acids are labelled “essential” because the human body can’t produce them on its own. Amino acids carry out many important bodily functions including giving cells their structure and are essential for healing wounds and repairing tissue.

Vitamins, Minerals and Fibre

Hemp seeds are rich in minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium sulfur, calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc. On top of this hemp seeds contain adequate amounts of Vitamin E, B vitamins including Folate, and Vitamin D3 (the only known plant food source of this incredibly important sunshine vitamin).

Hemp seeds are also high in insoluble and soluble fibre, providing more than enough to help keep your gastrointestinal system regular. A research study conducted in a Hong Kong university demonstrated hemp seed pills as an effective treatment for relieving functional constipation. The researchers found that a dose of 7.5 grams (Just under 1 tbsp) to be more effective and therapeutic than smaller doses of 2.5 or 5 grams.

Hemp Food in Australia & New Zealand

In April this year, Australia and New Zealand food regulators finally decided to follow the rest of the world and allow hemp to be sold as a food source. Coming into effect in November 2017, sales of low-THC hemp products including proteins, milks, flours and oils will be available to the public to consume as they please.

Big ups to the regulators involved! We can’t wait to see what interesting ways people find to use hemp products in their foods.

Wrap Up

Hemp seed is an excellent source of nutrition. The many benefits of hemp seeds can be attributed to high levels of essential fatty acids, being rich in vitamins and minerals, as well as a rich source of important amino acids in an easily digested protein.

P.S We will be following the post with some amazing hemp food recipes, keep your eyes peeled.

HEMP HEART LOW-DOWN

  1. Healthy fats at the ideal 3:1 ratio.
  2. High in protein (~25%), and contains the amazing proteins Edestin and Albumin
  3. High in gut healthy fibre
  4. High in fibre, minerals and vitamins
  5. Is now a legal food source in Aus & NZ



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